Wainwath Falls in Yorkshire Dales

Wainwath Falls in Yorkshire Dales

This is the second time I have photographed Wainwath Falls in the Yorkshire Dales. Last time was back in early 2007 and you can see the results of the original photo below. This time I use a tripod to create a soft, cotton wool like water effect. I had to turn the original image into black and white because the water was a horrible brown colour, because of the peat in it. This time the water was still the same colour, but I processed this area of the image using a brush in Lightroom to selectively desaturate the water. The autumnal colours above are the icing on the cake in my opinion.

Aira Force Waterfall, Lake District

Aira Force Waterfall, Lake District

The first time I saw Aira Force was on a Outward Bound trip in October 2004 with College. We went out at night with head torches and I never saw the view looking up at the falls that you can see in the image above. I only managed to look down from the small bridge at the top (it looks very different at night). This image was taken late last year on a photography weekend to Ullswater in the Lake District National Park. It was a difficult photograph to take as I wanted to do a long exposure on a tripod, but there was so much spray coming over the water that the lens got soaked after just a second to two of being pointed at the falls. The people at the top of the bridge are my friends Mike, Liz and Keith from the photography club. The full size version of this image is a little blurred, but I wanted to publish this image as I have a number of photographs of the area around the falls already online, but I only recently realised that the site is missing an image of the waterfall itself.

River Esk detail, Lake District

River Esk detail, Lake District

This is a good example of the type of photography my father excels at, and he was stood next to me when I took this photo last year. It really should have been taken on a tripod, but here a monopod was used. The strange looking effect on the water was captured because of a long exposure time compared to the speed the water was flowing. Unfortunately, this was photographed using my Canon Powershot digital compact and the original file is a JPEG. This means that the over exposed (very white part of the image in the bottom right) has no detail in it. It is an example where having a camera that takes photos in a RAW format, would make it possible to recover all the detail is this “blown out” area. Fortunately, as you read this I am probably taking photographs of rivers and streams in the National Park with my newer Nikon DSLR that does take RAW photos. Come back on Tuesday and find out what (if anything) I manage to capture!

Gray Mare’s Tail Waterfall, Moffat, Scotland

Gray Mare's Tail Waterfall, Moffat, Scotland

Gray Mare’s Tail turned out to be a waterfall. It sounded an interesting place on the map, but I never really expected a waterfall. From the above photograph you can’t really get a good idea of scale but the waterfall drops a spectacular 200 feet. If you click the image above to enlarge to the bigger version you will see a path at the very bottom and a small red dot. After I had taken this photo I walked back over the bridge and up to this red dot, which turned out to be a 2 foot square sign on a large gate. Hopefully that gives you a better idea of the size and scale of this waterfall.