The Moors Explorer at Goathland

The Moors Explorer at Goathland

Here we see the Moors Explorer steam locomotive pulling out of Goathland railway station on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway. Looking up the number 45428 on the front it appears this is the Eric Tracy locomotive and that the Moors Explorer has a different number. Not sure if any train enthusiasts reading this will be able to explain this slight confusion to me in the comments below? Either way I love the steam coming off the locomotive and the curve of the track towards the station. Not that it matters but it was raining at the time I took this photograph.

Albufeira Tourist Train, Portugal

Albufeira Tourist Train, Portugal

Walking back from the old town up to the more tourist area where we were staying, I noticed the tourist “train” driving towards me. I stood on a bench to get this photo and feel that it was the best angle from which to capture this vehicle as it drove past me into town. It’s certainly no high speed rail, the average Portuguese taxi driver will get you there twice as fast, but it is fun for the kids and a little faster than walking.¬†However I never went on the train as I find I see more when I walk around new places.

River Esk Locomotive in Steam

River Esk Locomotive in Steam

Back in 2007 when I first visited the Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway we took the 7 mile return trip from Ravenglass up to Eskdale and back again. This autumn I just wished to get a good photograph of one of the locomotives in action and right on cue the River Esk engine pulled into the platform. This narrow gauge heritage railway has a track only 15 inches wide (381 mm).

Nora 5 Engine at Blaenavon

Nora 5 Engine at Blaenavon

This is one of the few photos I have taken using the DSLR camera’s “Live View” feature. Even though I paid to go down the big pit there was still a tall fence between myself and this wonderful old train engine. The fence meant that to get the picture I wanted I couldn’t look through the camera’s viewfinder, but I didn’t want to just point the camera and guess how the picture was framed. Turning on the camera’s live view meant I could use the screen on the back just like compact cameras to frame the picture over the fence and capture the above image.