Water Statue in Trafford Park

Water Statue in Trafford Park

Unfortunately I couldn’t find out what this statue was officially called, because it was one of the few occasions when I have photographed a statue and not looked for a plaque with information on the artist and title. However, it probably didn’t have one as this statue is in front of a large office building and had large iron gates at the main entrance. This meant, I had to look over the gates to take the picture and even then this statue was a good 20 yards away from me, so it was one of the situations where I am thankful for a zoom lens.

I have seen much better pictures of this statue. I believe that the time of day was wrong and due to such high amounts of sunlight reflecting off the glass behind and the darkness of the statue itself, the camera found it more difficult to capture all the detail in the shadows. Now I know why my dad often says that “Cloudy days are statue photography days”.

Statue Details of Trafford Centre Entrance

Statue Details of Trafford Centre Entrance

Last week I showed you a much wider photograph of the newly built main entrance to the Trafford Centre. Obviously I feel that it is over the top for a shopping centre but when using a zoom lens to focus in on the details it is possible to find something a little more pleasing to the eye. Along the top of the building there are around two dozen of these statues, all very similar, but when I remove all but three I feel that it makes for an interesting photograph.

The light was certainly on my side a week last Saturday because it was warm, late afternoon winter light and this helped light up the gold and marble details. Hopefully next time I go to the Trafford Centre on a sunny day I will take my tripod which will enable me to get even closer and sharper photographs of the building and its more interesting details.

Trafford Centre Main Entrance with Statues

Trafford Centre Main Entrance with Statues

The Trafford Centre is a shopping centre in the north of England on the outskirts of Manchester. In the last six months this new entrance hall has been built in front of the Orient part of the complex. I am not sure if I really hate what we can see in the photo or if I like it. Photographically it does interest me because the statues and details make for some very interesting pictures BUT the fact that this part of the shopping mall is less than six months old makes it seem so horribly fake. As if the owners are just trying to show off how much profit they make.

I spent yesterday walking around Trafford Park, the Trafford Centre, Chill Factore and surrounding areas. It is very much designed from the ground up for people in cars; they park up in one of the 10,000 spaces and spend the day in the area, eating and shopping. I could go into a very long rant about how I don’t like the Trafford Centre, but I won’t because this website is a showcase for the photography, not an outlet for my rage at shopping, or how terrible “Hold fast to that which is good” sounds as a moto for a shopping centre.

Back to the job in hand. The afternoon light was really on my side here and helped light up the statues and columns in almost a perfect way. I had to stand on a rock to get this view and would probably get a better picture stood on step-ladders but they didn’t fit on the bus unfortunately. There was a nice mixture of blue sky and dark clouds and as much as it was very cold, the sun did come out for about half an hour and it does make a very large difference to the picture because of that. I would love to know your opinions on this entrace. Is it over the top? Do you love it and why? Comments below are welcomed.

St. Patrick’s Causeway Statue, Ireland

St. Patrick's Causeway Statue, Ireland

The statue in the above photograph was found within the grounds of Ballintubber Abbey which was founded in 1216. It marks the start of the ancient pilgrimage route to Croagh Patrick which has now been reopened as a cross-country pilgrimage and tourist trail. You can see the path goes of to the right of this statue through the field of sheep in the background. At 22 miles it wasn’t practical to do such a long walk but we did end up driving to the foot of Croagh Patrick (which is a 2,500 foot mountain) by Clew Bay.