Stained Glass at Auckland Museum

Stained Glass at Auckland Museum

Officially called Auckland War Memorial Museum. There is a large portion of the building devoted to the wars that New Zealander’s took part in. Most notably the first and second World Wars. Having visited the Auckland Museum a number of times before I very nearly didn’t take my camera on the most recent visit. This visit’s guided tour took me to whole new areas of the building. The ornate and modern stained glass photographed here was found in a corner of the building. The sunlight really highlighted the fantastic colours in this artwork.

Even so must the Son of Man be lifted up

Even so must the Son of Man be lifted up

The above stained glass photograph was taken hand held in Salisbury Cathedral’s transept. In the shadow areas on the edges of the image you can just about make out the vaulted ceiling, delicately lit by the clerestory windows on either side. Although slightly tricky to read, the text at the bottom of the three panels of glass put together reads “Even so must the Son of Man by lifted up”.

The Ascension Stained Glass

The Ascension Stained Glass

This is the main section of the large and ornate east window of All Saints’ Church in Orton in Cumbria. The building dates from the 13th century but has had several restorations and much of the stained glass is relatively modern and in perfect condition. This makes photographic studies of works of art very worth while. The above example was produced by Clayton and Bell, one of the most prolific workshops of stained glass during the latter half of the 19th century in England.

St Ninian and St Michael Stained Glass

St Ninian and St Michael Stained Glass

With stained glass photography I usually try to get in as close as I can to focus just on one window or even just a small section of a single window. However, here I chose to include two windows as I think that they compliment each other well. On the left is St. Ninian, who was an early missionary from the 4th or 5th century to what is now Scotland. On the right is St. Michael who is an archangel and is viewed as the field commander of the Army of God.