Lake Rotomahana

This inlet on the shore of Lake Rotomahana makes the lake look small. It is under 4 miles long with a maximum width of 1.7 miles. It is the largest crater lake in the area. Before the 1886 eruption it was two smaller lakes. Walking along the shore of the lake I took many photographs. This was my favourite as I liked the reflection of the sky and trees in the foreground. What you don’t see in this image is the frogs. Despite not seeing them, I could hear them whilst taking this photograph.

Devil’s Cave at Waitotapu

Sometimes called the Devil’s pool. This water pond is made yellow by sulfur. Having photographed this before I had always really struggled to capture the intense green yellow colour of the water. In reality its more like a highlighter pen but the camera struggles to pick it up. Usually I avoid including people in my photographs. Here I thought that the tourists on the left helped show the scale of the pool.

Central Pools at Waiotapu

The central pools of the Waiotapu Thermal Wonderland in New Zealand are my favourite. This look out is the best to see the majority of the geothermal attraction. The orange area in the top right is the iconic Champagne Pool. Overflowing water from the Champagne Pool brings up minerals that originated deep below the surface. As the water cools, it evaporates and exposes minerals that provide a showcase of colours. This area never looks the same each time I visit, as it changes depending on the sunlight and water level.

Curio Bay, Catlins

Curio Bay, Catlins

An ancient Petrified Forest lies on the shore of Curio Bay. Dating back to when dinosaurs romanced the Catlins area of New Zealand. It’s one of the world’s least disturbed examples of a Jurassic period petrified forest. Some 180 million years old. This is the view from the lookout. If you look to the right of the frame you can see some white stairs which take people down to sea level. Here you can get up close to the hundreds of fossilised tree stumps with their growth rings.