Inside Dunedin Railway Station

Inside Dunedin Railway Station

This is the booking hall inside the large and picturesque station. The titled walls and mosaic floors were very impressive. Having seeing many photographs of the outside of this ornate building, it was a great surprise to find it equally interesting inside. Built at the turn of the 20th century it was at one time the countries busiest station, handling up to 100 trains a day. Sadly, only a handful use the station today.

Burt Munro’s Motorbikes

Burt Munro's Motorbikes

E Hayes and Sons is a large hardware store in Invercargill. Walking through the front door you see a normal household department store, with plates, pots and pans. In the rooms behind are more DIY equipment such as power tools and screws. Wondering around the shop you come across a number of motorbikes and a few cars. This isn’t your average shop. It also contains a museum to Burt Munro. You can see this strange juxtaposition in the above photograph.

Inside Dunedin Railway Station

Inside Dunedin Railway Station

In relatively new country such as New Zealand it is rare to find very old buildings. The most architecturally impressive I have found so far is Dunedin Railway Station. What was must unexpected was the interior. With the ornate mosaic floor, old wooden doors and benches, walking through the main entrance was like stepping back in time one hundred years.

Manapouri Hydroelectric Power Station

Manapouri Hydroelectric Power Station

This is the main machine hall at New Zealand’s largest hydroelectric power station. Not the most photogenic subject I captured that day, but an amazing engineering achievement for the country. This hall, along with the rest of the power station, was excavated from solid granite rock, 200 metres below Lake Manapouri. Built between 1964 and 1971. The seven blue machines are the generators at the top of each seven turbines that extend far below the floor.

Interior of the Thean Hou Temple

Interior of the Thean Hou Temple

The Thean Hou Temple was difficult to get to using public transport but it was well worth the effort. I went for the view looking across to Kuala Lumpur’s city centre. What surprised me the most was the sense of peace that the temple had, even with crowds of tourists there. Above is the interior, showing the main altar with Mazu in the centre. Mazu is a Chinese goddess of the sea.