Old wooden cart

Old wooden cart

This old wooden cart was found under a large tree in the Stoneridge Estate. They have a large vineyard on the estate and so I assume this was originally used as farming equipment. I suspect it has been sat there for a long time and probably not used in modern wine production. Abandoned machinery such as this, especially when made of wood is always fascinated to look at in my opinion. Especially when processed into a black and white photograph to enhance the texture.

Looking up at the Sky Tower

Looking up at the Sky Tower

The Sky Tower is an observation and telecommunications tower in the centre of  Auckland. Since it’s completion in 1997 it has become an icon of Auckland’s  modern skyline. In addition to going up in the lift to the Skydeck at 220  metres, you can opt for the Skywalk or Skyjump. The Skywalk is a group activity  which involves walking around the edge of the tower. You can see someone leaning  over the edge if you look closely on the top right side (they are on a harness).  The Skyjump is a 192 metre guide-cable-controlled jump. This is what the two  wires coming down from the tower are for. In this photograph, they serve to draw  the eye up to the “Skywalker” at the top.

Mud pool detail

Mud pool detail

Waiotapu is one of the best active geothermal areas in New Zealand. Much of this thermal wonderland costs an entry fee to visit, such as the Lady Knox Gyser. It is well worth the money. Nearby are the mud pools which are fee. Whilst not quite as dramatic and picturesque they are well worth a visit. It is on the site of a large mud volcano which was destroyed through erosion in the 1920’s leaving these pools. The above photograph is a close up of the grey mud as it bubbles up. Capturing a still photograph was tricky, really I need a camera that could capture video. The sounds of the erupting mud were very sequel. It reminded me of a pan of mushroom soup boiling in slow motion. Not that I would try but I expect the pool tastes nothing like mushroom soup!

The Kingston Flyer

The Kingston Flyer

Originally the Kingston Flyer ran between Kingston and Invercargill or Dunedin in the south. Sadly, in 1937 the passenger services on the line closed. In 1971 the Railways Department started operating the trains as a heritage service. Today the Kingston Flyer doesn’t go very far but is spectacular to see. I came across it quite by chance, nearly getting the hire car shunted off the tracks as I drove quickly across the level crossing. Many of the more rural crossings in New Zealand have no lights or barrier. Simply a sign saying give way to trains and look both ways before crossing!