Creamoata factory

Creamoata factory

I’ve never heard of Creamoata before coming to Gore, a town in the middle of the Southland region of New Zealand. This factory was the home of Creamoata. An oatmeal porridge that was the breakfast for thousands of New Zealander’s for much of the last century. The cartoon character on the left side of the building is Sergeant Dan. The mill was built in 1919 and was closed in 2001. This factory was a big local employer. The town’s library had a large exhibition all about Creamoata and Sergeant Dan.

Eastgate and Eastgate Clock

Eastgate and Eastgate Clock

In the heart of Chester city centre is this famous clock. Opened to the public in 1899 to celebrate Queen Victoria’s 80th birthday. It stands on the site of the original entrance to the Roman fortress. Chester has one of the best preserved Roman walls in Britain. The full circuit of the wall around the centre of Chester is 2 miles long and well worth the wall along the top of the wall. There are many black and white timber buildings in Chester. The one on the left of this photograph is a great example built in 1395. It is one of the most impressive things to see in the city. 

Ferry across the Mersey

Ferry across the Mersey

You can see some of the new modern architecture with the famous Royal Liver Building in the centre. On the far right is Museum of Liverpool which I still haven’t had a chance to explore inside. It had been many years since I last visited Liverpool. Knowing I wanted to return I also knew that parking in the city centre was expensive. One of the best ways to get into Liverpool is to take the ferry. Parking up at the free Seacombe Car Park it was a two minute walk from the car onto the ferry. The ferry only took 10 minutes to cross the river to the Liverpool Waterfront. This photograph was taken as we got back to the car in the mid afternoon looking east across the River Mersey. 

Calke Abbey

Calke Abbey

Back in the UK for another family reunion. This time we spend the long May bank holiday weekend at a farm house in Calke (pronounced Cork). Being so close we all made sure we visited the abbey. This Baroque mansion was built in 1701 but was never actually an abbey. It was owner by the Harper family for nearly 300 years. Today it is in the care of the National Trust. The grounds were expansive and well worth a visit. Inside much of the interior is in a variety of states of decay. This was surprising but still very interesting to see.