Nelson’s Monument Close Up, Edinburgh

Nelson's Monument Close Up, Edinburgh

I can’t believe it has taken me so long to rediscover this photo taken in Edinburgh back in 2008. It was in my collection of favourites from the trip but somehow never made it online. To create the huge perspective distortion I used my Sigma 10-20mm super wide angle lens. I think this effect coupled with the dark blue sky really helps make the monument stand out.

Scottish Parliament Building

Scottish Parliament Building

This very controversial building has been featured and photographed before, but here I wanted to show the main entrance of what I think its a unique and interesting looking building. The fact that it took 5 years rather than 2 years to build and cost £414 million rather than £40 million is in my opinion disgusting. However, putting that fact aside for a second, this is a unique building that I enjoyed recording.

Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh

Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh

From the edge of the of the Salisbury Crags in Holyrood Park you get a great view of Edinburgh city centre and the buildings in the surrounding area, none more so than the Palace of Holyroodhouse. Founded as a monastery by David I, King of Scots in 1128, it has served as the principal residence of the Kings and Queens of Scotland since the 15th century. With a nice wide angle lens at the gates of the main entrance you can get a clearer photo (no trees), but I still prefer this higher viewing angle to get a better idea of size.

Port of Leith – Dock Details

Port of Leith - Dock Details

Leith and the Water of Leith are areas of Edinburgh that I feel are not explored as much as many of the tourist locations around the city. As I have previously described, Leith is to Edinburgh what Salford Quays is to Manchester, only Leith didn’t get rid of all its industry and the docks are more interesting from a purely historical point of view. Yes, Salford Quays has lovely modern architecture that makes for great night photography, but there is sometime very historic about the docks at Leith, as the above photograph attempts to illustrate.

National Monument Edinburgh

National Monument Edinburgh

“Verticals should be vertical” is what I am often told by various photographer friends of mine. “You don’t want leaning verticals or converging verticals”. Well in the above version of a previously published photo of Edinburgh’s National Monument, I have straightened the verticals using Photoshop. You can see the originally posted image below showing you a classic example of “converging verticals”. In this case I prefer the photo below and believe that sometimes photographers can get too caught up in the “rules” and as much as a lot of people hate this photo of the monument, it is one of my favourites of Edinburgh.