Port Sunlight Museum

Port Sunlight Museum

Port Sunlight is s a unique and beautiful 19th century garden village. Created for the Sunlight Soap factory workers. Today there are 900 listed buildings in this small suburb. Opposite the Lady Lever Art Gallery is the museum pictured here. Built in 1913 it was originally the Girls Club. We were only in the village for a very short time and didn’t get a chance to go inside and explore the museum. The brightly coloured flowers drew my eye to capture this wide view of the museum.

Gardeners potting room

Gardeners potting room

Walking around Calke Abbey gardeners was fantastic. Bright flower beds and well designed vegetable gardens. I took many photographs but this was one many others missed. In the middle of the garden is a large brick house. I assume this would have been the head gardeners home. Walking up to a dark doorway it felt like I was stepping back in time. I looked through to find the head gardeners office. Scenes like this with the old, rusting tools hanging up are great record photographs. The crumbling plaster and paint on the wall behind add to the feeling of stepping back in time 100 years.

The Beatles Statue Liverpool

The Beatles Statue Liverpool

This statue was one of the first things we saw when we got to Liverpool. Rather than driving into the city centre, we drove to Seacombe on the other side of the River. Free parking and a ten minute picturesque ferry across the River Mersey. We arrived in the heart of the waterfront. Getting off the ferry at Liverpool Pier Head Ferry Terminal . For those already in the city looking for this statue, it is at the end of Brunswick Street. This 1.2 tone bronze statue was sculpted by Andrew Edwards. The fab four are very detailed and a little larger than life size. We had to wait a few minutes for other tourists to have their photographs taken in front of the statue.

Calke Abbey

Calke Abbey

Back in the UK for another family reunion. This time we spend the long May bank holiday weekend at a farm house in Calke (pronounced Cork). Being so close we all made sure we visited the abbey. This Baroque mansion was built in 1701 but was never actually an abbey. It was owner by the Harper family for nearly 300 years. Today it is in the care of the National Trust. The grounds were expansive and well worth a visit. Inside much of the interior is in a variety of states of decay. This was surprising but still very interesting to see.